joe fattorini 1

Better ask Joe…

If you’ve been watching The Wine Show and found yourself thinking “that Joe Fattorini seems like a nice guy”, then I’m here to tell you that he really is!  We met Joe at a tasting last year, had a chat about the show and hung out for a while.  Friendly, chatty, knowledgeable and generous with his time – yep… definitely a nice guy.

Of course, that was his error as I set about stalking him on twitter and bouncing a few ideas off him which somehow ended up with him making the offer for me to email him a few questions to answer.  I can only assume her saw this as a cheaper alternative to taking out a restraining order.  Anyway, such was the quality of his answers I’ve decided to spin them out over the course of five newsletters.


In this edition we asked for his pointers about hunting down the best value in 2018…

BOTH MikeThanks for joining us, Joe.  2017 saw the double whammy of an historically poor harvest in most of Europe and the fall of the pound following BREXIT.  We’re now seeing the associated price increases flow through from suppliers. We love a “new find” at BinTwo and relish getting behind wines from less well known origins.  Any top tips on where we should look to find great value, interesting wines in 2018?




joe fattorini 1“This is an interesting one. It’s not a fashionable view, but I think the poor harvest is a bigger issue than the value of the pound. Volumes in 2017 are down 30%, 40%… more in some places. It was an extraordinary vintage. And so early too. I was meeting producers last year who’d harvested in July and August rather than September. That will push up prices, but more importantly, push us all into new regions.

The Pound feels low, and is lower than we’ve been used to it. But it’s not much lower than the average value against the Euro between 2010 and 2014. But the duty escalator and coupled with the rising pound between 2014 to 2016 means we’ve really felt the return to a that lower level with a serious bump. I blame government tax policy more than Brexit for that pain. What really matters is finding interesting wines now.

My gut feel is that Eastern Europe and Australia are two early winners. Those semi-aromatic whites like Furmint blends from Slovenia or straight Furmints from Hungary. New lighter and fresher whites and tamer premium reds from Australia too, filling in the gaps left by Chianti Classico or Macon where vintages have been rough. I suspect varieties to look out for are Verdejo, Vermentino, Bobal and all sorts from Aus. There are some great Fianos and fresh Chardonnays and I loved the different styles of Shiraz at the recent Australia Day Tastings in London.”

Footnote:  we took this advice to heart at this year’s tastings and have some cracking finds heading to the BinTwo shelves including some knock-out (and great value) wines from Australia.  Watch this space..